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Ann Huybens spring—summer 1998.
Her designs aim to combine exoticism and serenity, nostalgia and desire, chaos and peace. In concrete terms she translates this philosophy into clothes which are designed and made, literally and metaphorically, round the body.  All pieces in her collections can only be ordered to measure. She creates mainly for women, regardless of age, shape or size. 
Her collections always contain sections for afternoons, evenings and nights. Huybens intends this division into three sections to represent the circular course taken by a woman’s life. Her clothing is three-dimensional, wound in a spiral round the body, with no beginning and no end, an unceasing movement. She uses stitching, piping and contrasting colours to emphasise the seams that run round the body. Asymmetric fastenings, details and shapes ensure freedom of movement. A spiral skirt and a tango dress are typical items in her collections. The spiral skirt is a skirt with neither beginning nor end, wound in a spiral round the hips. Her tango dress has a long train that can be tied up by means of a small loop. Let’s dance! 
In her choice of fabrics she is always on the lookout for material that is kind to the skin, and so natural rather than synthetic. Organic prints, embroidery and shot fabrics supply changes in colour as the wearer moves or the light changes. The seven shades of colour appearing on the Tranche de Vie print on silk crêpe, provide an example of her favourite colours, ranging from strong colours to gentle shades. Her love for the organic is so great that she uses natural materials in her designs. Shoes for example are given a ‘drumstick’ heel or made entirely from pony or ostrich leather. (Mink shawls and feather boas, wraparound suede belt 5 metres long)
Ann Huybens: I find a man dressed in a very refined dress the height of eroticism. I go on the assumption that men have the right to wear dresses, to be able to feel very fine materials on their body. It seems to me they have even less freedom than women in how they can move and behave. 

Ann Huybens spring—summer 1998.

Her designs aim to combine exoticism and serenity, nostalgia and desire, chaos and peace. In concrete terms she translates this philosophy into clothes which are designed and made, literally and metaphorically, round the body.  All pieces in her collections can only be ordered to measure. She creates mainly for women, regardless of age, shape or size. 

Her collections always contain sections for afternoons, evenings and nights. Huybens intends this division into three sections to represent the circular course taken by a woman’s life. Her clothing is three-dimensional, wound in a spiral round the body, with no beginning and no end, an unceasing movement. She uses stitching, piping and contrasting colours to emphasise the seams that run round the body. Asymmetric fastenings, details and shapes ensure freedom of movement. A spiral skirt and a tango dress are typical items in her collections. The spiral skirt is a skirt with neither beginning nor end, wound in a spiral round the hips. Her tango dress has a long train that can be tied up by means of a small loop. Let’s dance! 

In her choice of fabrics she is always on the lookout for material that is kind to the skin, and so natural rather than synthetic. Organic prints, embroidery and shot fabrics supply changes in colour as the wearer moves or the light changes. The seven shades of colour appearing on the Tranche de Vie print on silk crêpe, provide an example of her favourite colours, ranging from strong colours to gentle shades. Her love for the organic is so great that she uses natural materials in her designs. Shoes for example are given a ‘drumstick’ heel or made entirely from pony or ostrich leather. (Mink shawls and feather boas, wraparound suede belt 5 metres long)

Ann Huybens: I find a man dressed in a very refined dress the height of eroticism. I go on the assumption that men have the right to wear dresses, to be able to feel very fine materials on their body. It seems to me they have even less freedom than women in how they can move and behave. 

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Patrick Van Ommeslaeghe autumn—winter 1999—00, spring—summer 2000, autumn—winter 2000—01, spring—summer 2001.
After a brief stint at medical school, Patrick Van Ommeslaeghe came to the conclusion that he preferred working with living and breathing bodies rather than performing autopsies on human corpses. 
He enrolled at the Fashion Design Department of the Royal Academy of Antwerp, from which he graduated in 1990. 
Between 1992 and 1996 he was Josephus Thimister’s first assistant atBalenciaga, at the same time dealing with the foreign licences of this house.
Once settled in Paris, he decided to stay. A year as an assistant to Jean-Paul Gaultier was followed by two years of being Adéline André’s right hand man.
In 1998 he returned to Balenciaga, then under the direction of Nicolas Ghesquiere, mainly dealing with the licences for Japan. 
Then, In 1999, the time had come to launch his own collection under the name Van Ommeslaeghe. His first collection for women, for winter 1999-2000, based around the concept of dignity and inspired by the painting of the Flemish Primitives, was presented in March 1999.
It met with immediate acclaim and the designer was recognised by the Association Nationale pour le Développement des Arts de la Mode au Ministère de la Culture (ANDAM), in awarding him their fashion grant. 

Patrick Van Ommeslaeghe autumn—winter 1999—00, spring—summer 2000, autumn—winter 2000—01, spring—summer 2001.

After a brief stint at medical school, Patrick Van Ommeslaeghe came to the conclusion that he preferred working with living and breathing bodies rather than performing autopsies on human corpses. 

He enrolled at the Fashion Design Department of the Royal Academy of Antwerp, from which he graduated in 1990. 

Between 1992 and 1996 he was Josephus Thimister’s first assistant atBalenciaga, at the same time dealing with the foreign licences of this house.

Once settled in Paris, he decided to stay. A year as an assistant to Jean-Paul Gaultier was followed by two years of being Adéline André’s right hand man.

In 1998 he returned to Balenciaga, then under the direction of Nicolas Ghesquiere, mainly dealing with the licences for Japan. 

Then, In 1999, the time had come to launch his own collection under the name Van Ommeslaeghe. His first collection for women, for winter 1999-2000, based around the concept of dignity and inspired by the painting of the Flemish Primitives, was presented in March 1999.

It met with immediate acclaim and the designer was recognised by the Association Nationale pour le Développement des Arts de la Mode au Ministère de la Culture (ANDAM), in awarding him their fashion grant. 

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Maison Martin Margiela spring—summer 1996.
October 1995.La Maison de la Mutualité on Paris’ left bank. The forty-four women wearing the collection walk over four refectory tables each twenty-two meters long. Bottles of red wine and white plastic cups have been placed on the tables so that the invited public can help themselves. The show has two parts. For the first part the women wear cotton muslim veils obscuring their faces; their outfits combine the garments-of-photographs-of-garments with other pieces from the collection. Only the photographic prints are worn for the second part. The women’s faces are visible and their hair down. For those who wore a print skirt their breasts are now bare; the others, who wore a print top, wear these with a simple flesh-toned slip skirt. The sound of cheerleaders punctuates the atmosphere created by the amplified sound of the women’s footsteps on the tables.  

Maison Martin Margiela spring—summer 1996.

October 1995.
La Maison de la Mutualité on Paris’ left bank. The forty-four women wearing the collection walk over four refectory tables each twenty-two meters long. Bottles of red wine and white plastic cups have been placed on the tables so that the invited public can help themselves. The show has two parts. For the first part the women wear cotton muslim veils obscuring their faces; their outfits combine the garments-of-photographs-of-garments with other pieces from the collection. Only the photographic prints are worn for the second part. The women’s faces are visible and their hair down. For those who wore a print skirt their breasts are now bare; the others, who wore a print top, wear these with a simple flesh-toned slip skirt. The sound of cheerleaders punctuates the atmosphere created by the amplified sound of the women’s footsteps on the tables.  

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Angelo Figus autumn—winter 2000—01.

Angelo Figus autumn—winter 2000—01.

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Véronique Leroy autumn—winter 1998—99.
Véronique Leroy, who works in Paris, won the Gouden Spoel (Golden Spindle) competition in 1989. She was the first and only non-graduate of the Antwerp Fashion Academy (she studied at Studio Berçot in Paris) to win this prestigious award. After her studies she worked for a while as an assistant to Azzedine Alaïa and Martine Sitbon. In 1991 she presented her first collection.
Véronique Leroy has developed her own signature, with seemingly relaxed radicalness and an aversion to trends and avant-garde. Her designs are just incredibly feminine and sexy. She stands for radical, ‘unguarded’ elegance, and she always went, already in times when fashion was still dictated by minimalism, for an uncompromising ‘sensuel de l’éclat’ (the sensuality of brilliancy). 
She converts anything which ‘better’ taste labels vulgar into ‘sublimely vulgar’. She replaces ‘noble’ materials with common ones, which she elevates in her creations by treating them just as respectfully. She uses materials like lurex, vinyl, polyester and fake fur, or synthetic leather-imitations, superimposing prints that feature from predators to marsupials. 
And goes on to add bright colours, such as pink, apple green and gold. The finish? As perfect as perfect can be. To quote the last paragraph of a poem that Stéphanie Cohen wrote about her: Her soul is not black, her skin not white./She is full of colours, way off trends/Her life is not clear, her fashion not a rose,/her tongue is rather clear, for the one that can hear. 

Véronique Leroy autumn—winter 1998—99.

Véronique Leroy, who works in Paris, won the Gouden Spoel (Golden Spindle) competition in 1989. She was the first and only non-graduate of the Antwerp Fashion Academy (she studied at Studio Berçot in Paris) to win this prestigious award. After her studies she worked for a while as an assistant to Azzedine Alaïa and Martine Sitbon. In 1991 she presented her first collection.

Véronique Leroy has developed her own signature, with seemingly relaxed radicalness and an aversion to trends and avant-garde. Her designs are just incredibly feminine and sexy. She stands for radical, ‘unguarded’ elegance, and she always went, already in times when fashion was still dictated by minimalism, for an uncompromising ‘sensuel de l’éclat’ (the sensuality of brilliancy). 

She converts anything which ‘better’ taste labels vulgar into ‘sublimely vulgar’. She replaces ‘noble’ materials with common ones, which she elevates in her creations by treating them just as respectfully. She uses materials like lurex, vinyl, polyester and fake fur, or synthetic leather-imitations, superimposing prints that feature from predators to marsupials. 

And goes on to add bright colours, such as pink, apple green and gold. The finish? As perfect as perfect can be. To quote the last paragraph of a poem that Stéphanie Cohen wrote about her: Her soul is not black, her skin not white./She is full of colours, way off trends/Her life is not clear, her fashion not a rose,/her tongue is rather clear, for the one that can hear. 

(Source: dekonstruktivisme, via dekonstruktivisme)

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A.F. Vandevorst autumn—winter 2000—01.
This collection of A.F. Vandevorst is a work around horses.Their femininity and grace as well as the force and purity of this animal are translated in the silhouette. The robust element reveals in structured forms and masculine garments as overcoats, men shirts, corduroy pants, long johns and solid boots. This aspect is emphasized by the use of raw and firm fabrics: felt, leather, tweed, corduroy and heavy cotton, in woollen check-patterns and in knitwear. The elegant counterpart is represented in fluid lines of bias cutted dresses and skirts, mostly knee-length or ¾, and refined fabrics as silk chiffon, viscose and flowing wool. The grace of the manes, raw or braided, is reworked in the back of shirts and dresses and fully expressed in the hairstyle of the models. These two opposite senses lead their own way through the collection but find themselves reunited in one garment. Crucial for this winter collection are the elements of a saddle; its form as well as the artisan method of assembling and riveting. All of this is manufactured in tones of brown and natural with vivid colours such as violet, grass, red and white.

A.F. Vandevorst autumn—winter 2000—01.

This collection of A.F. Vandevorst is a work around horses.
Their femininity and grace as well as the force and purity of this animal are translated in the silhouette. The robust element reveals in structured forms and masculine garments as overcoats, men shirts, corduroy pants, long johns and solid boots. This aspect is emphasized by the use of raw and firm fabrics: felt, leather, tweed, corduroy and heavy cotton, in woollen check-patterns and in knitwear. The elegant counterpart is represented in fluid lines of bias cutted dresses and skirts, mostly knee-length or ¾, and refined fabrics as silk chiffon, viscose and flowing wool. The grace of the manes, raw or braided, is reworked in the back of shirts and dresses and fully expressed in the hairstyle of the models. These two opposite senses lead their own way through the collection but find themselves reunited in one garment. Crucial for this winter collection are the elements of a saddle; its form as well as the artisan method of assembling and riveting. All of this is manufactured in tones of brown and natural with vivid colours such as violet, grass, red and white.

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Ann Demeulemeester spring—summer 1995.
Ann Demeulemeester: I’m preoccupied with volume, larger, looser, but in a very erotical way. I try to cut a certain sensual movement into the clothes, a casual spirit, as if something is blown apart by the wind.

Ann Demeulemeester spring—summer 1995.

Ann Demeulemeester: I’m preoccupied with volume, larger, looser, but in a very erotical way. I try to cut a certain sensual movement into the clothes, a casual spirit, as if something is blown apart by the wind.

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Rei Kawakubo 1st statement, backstage. Comme des Garçons autumn—winter 2001—02, at the Royal Athenaeum Antwerp, 26 May 2001.
First presentation of the Comme des Garçons Autumn-Winter 2001-2 collection at the Royal Athenaeum, Antwep.
The Rei Kawakubo project consists of five presentations: from 26 May to 29 September this fashion designer is showing several interpretations of her Autumn-Winter 2001-2 collection.
The presentations take place at the following locations: the Royal Athenaeum (26 May), the Royal Museum of Fine Art (22 June), the church of St Augustine (27 July), the Commodity Exchange (24 August) and the Winter Garden at the Antwerp  Zoo (29 September).
Of the five statements, the one in the Commodity Exchange at 9 p.m. on 24 August, is open to the public. Because of the limited space, admission to the other four venues is by invation only. 
All the statements are being filmed and shown throughout the project at the 2WOMEN exhibition.

Rei Kawakubo 1st statement, backstage. Comme des Garçons autumnwinter 200102, at the Royal Athenaeum Antwerp, 26 May 2001.

First presentation of the Comme des Garçons Autumn-Winter 2001-2 collection at the Royal Athenaeum, Antwep.

The Rei Kawakubo project consists of five presentations: from 26 May to 29 September this fashion designer is showing several interpretations of her Autumn-Winter 2001-2 collection.

The presentations take place at the following locations: the Royal Athenaeum (26 May), the Royal Museum of Fine Art (22 June), the church of St Augustine (27 July), the Commodity Exchange (24 August) and the Winter Garden at the Antwerp  Zoo (29 September).

Of the five statements, the one in the Commodity Exchange at 9 p.m. on 24 August, is open to the public. Because of the limited space, admission to the other four venues is by invation only. 

All the statements are being filmed and shown throughout the project at the 2WOMEN exhibition.

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Ann Demeulemeester spring—summer 1999.
How do you suggest movement? How do you un-balance a body? How do you ‘cut’ a garment that challenges gravity? These question result, with Ann Demeulemeester, in clothes that evoke the illusion of movement, even when the wearer is standing still. Trousers slip down a little, a cardigan gapes open, a draped dress exposes a shoulder: mainly impressions of a casualness that would never betray the complicated study which was often required to achieve it. 
How can I make a collection from painter’s canvas? That was the basic question behind the Summer 1999 collection. This favourite material, which she had already used for invitations, displays and even tables, was ‘translated’ into an almost exclusively white collection. The shapes, developing further on those she started for the Winter 1998-99 collection, were conceived from what Ann Demeulemeester describes as ‘zero base’, the source of the ‘shape issue’; to set aside the repertoire of traditional patterns and to confront herself with the essence of a garment: a piece of material which you can wrap around yourself. 
This ever-recurring issue, and the difficult task she has set herself, seem to be Ann Demeulemeester’s raison d’être. A ‘de-depicted’ world, which allows entirely new ideas to develop, in which a simple intervention is all-important, in which nothing disrupts the investigation of the body, or wearability. And a world in which the whole gamut of emotions evoked by a garment — from surrender to rejection, from security to alienation — can be meticulously constructed …
The cloth is holy. 

Ann Demeulemeester spring—summer 1999.

How do you suggest movement? How do you un-balance a body? How do you ‘cut’ a garment that challenges gravity? These question result, with Ann Demeulemeester, in clothes that evoke the illusion of movement, even when the wearer is standing still. Trousers slip down a little, a cardigan gapes open, a draped dress exposes a shoulder: mainly impressions of a casualness that would never betray the complicated study which was often required to achieve it. 

How can I make a collection from painter’s canvas? That was the basic question behind the Summer 1999 collection. This favourite material, which she had already used for invitations, displays and even tables, was ‘translated’ into an almost exclusively white collection. The shapes, developing further on those she started for the Winter 1998-99 collection, were conceived from what Ann Demeulemeester describes as ‘zero base’, the source of the ‘shape issue’; to set aside the repertoire of traditional patterns and to confront herself with the essence of a garment: a piece of material which you can wrap around yourself. 

This ever-recurring issue, and the difficult task she has set herself, seem to be Ann Demeulemeester’s raison d’être. A ‘de-depicted’ world, which allows entirely new ideas to develop, in which a simple intervention is all-important, in which nothing disrupts the investigation of the body, or wearability. And a world in which the whole gamut of emotions evoked by a garment — from surrender to rejection, from security to alienation — can be meticulously constructed …

The cloth is holy. 

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Bernhard Willhelm spring—summer 2001. 
Just a spoonful of sugarDon’t you love the sounds and smells in your kitchen? Melting butter, boiling water, the kettle that sings its own sweet song, the cake that rises beautifully in the oven and smells like heaven…The strongest women today are to be found in their kitchens and it’s no move backwards whatsoever. After all, where would we be without lovingly prepared food that nourishes body and soul? Did you ever plan a revolution on an empty stomach? You’ll not only find us in the kitchen at parties, but at any moment when the mood -or hunger pangs- strikes us. No more ready-made microwave meals for the modern girl! Just say no! Take your apron, sling it in, grab your pots, pans and kitchen utensils and get creative! To get you started on the good foot for, here’s a great recipe to start with your friends next time they pop around at your place keen on having a good time: Peanut butter salad sauce -2 spoons of peanut butter-3 spoons salad sauce or mayonnaise (the fatter the better)-1/2 spoon of sugar-1/4 spoon of saltStir the peanut butter with the back of a wooden spoon until creamy, then add the other ingredients and keep on stirring until smooth.Delicious served with salad, cucumber and tomatoes!Discoveries in the kitchen and when walking in nature, plus interaction with the rest of the family all play important roles in the spring/summer collection of Bernhard Willhelm.After all, you don’t have to climb Mount Everest to get to know yourself -the most important lessons you can learn you receive when going about so-called mundane activities.Hence the embroidered aprons, landscapes (Bavaria, Auvergne, Beach) either hand painted, stitched or embroidered on bourette silk or cotton silk and used for skirts, huge crocheted button knots and bows, smock and other naive details, like pumps covered in multicoloured crochets.For the darling housewife look you’ll find the perfect dress, either high necked, with a pretty bow and elasticised waist - a bi theme throughout the collection or a “uniform style” dress that your favourite cleaning lady would love to own. Décolleté, uneven skirt seams tied in knots and pockets big enough to stash your favourite recipe book in, makes it hard to choose the ideal outfit here.To go with the dress, why not opt for a comfy jacket, its colourful embroidered African beads circling the neck? Ideal for rushing to the supermarket in, to buy fresh ingredients for you next cook fest.

Bernhard Willhelm springsummer 2001. 

Just a spoonful of sugar

Don’t you love the sounds and smells in your kitchen? Melting butter, boiling water, the kettle that sings its own sweet song, the cake that rises beautifully in the oven and smells like heaven…

The strongest women today are to be found in their kitchens and it’s no move backwards whatsoever. After all, where would we be without lovingly prepared food that nourishes body and soul? 
Did you ever plan a revolution on an empty stomach? You’ll not only find us in the kitchen at parties, but at any moment when the mood -or hunger pangs- strikes us. No more ready-made microwave meals for the modern girl! Just say no! Take your apron, sling it in, grab your pots, pans and kitchen utensils and get creative! To get you started on the good foot for, here’s a great recipe to start with your friends next time they pop around at your place keen on having a good time: 

Peanut butter salad sauce 
-2 spoons of peanut butter
-3 spoons salad sauce or mayonnaise (the fatter the better)
-1/2 spoon of sugar
-1/4 spoon of salt
Stir the peanut butter with the back of a wooden spoon until creamy, then add the other ingredients and keep on stirring until smooth.
Delicious served with salad, cucumber and tomatoes!

Discoveries in the kitchen and when walking in nature, plus interaction with the rest of the family all play important roles in the spring/summer collection of Bernhard Willhelm.
After all, you don’t have to climb Mount Everest to get to know yourself -the most important lessons you can learn you receive when going about so-called mundane activities.
Hence the embroidered aprons, landscapes (Bavaria, Auvergne, Beach) either hand painted, stitched or embroidered on bourette silk or cotton silk and used for skirts, huge crocheted button knots and bows, smock and other naive details, like pumps covered in multicoloured crochets.

For the darling housewife look you’ll find the perfect dress, either high necked, with a pretty bow and elasticised waist - a bi theme throughout the collection or a “uniform style” dress that your favourite cleaning lady would love to own. Décolleté, uneven skirt seams tied in knots and pockets big enough to stash your favourite recipe book in, makes it hard to choose the ideal outfit here.
To go with the dress, why not opt for a comfy jacket, its colourful embroidered African beads circling the neck? Ideal for rushing to the supermarket in, to buy fresh ingredients for you next cook fest.

(via shoulderblades)

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Patrick Van Ommeslaeghe autumn—winter 1999—00.
After a brief stint at medical school, Patrick Van Ommeslaeghe came to the conclusion that he preferred working with living and breathing bodies rather than performing autopsies on human corpses. 
He enrolled at the Fashion Design Department of the Royal Academy of Antwerp, from which he graduated in 1990. 
Between 1992 and 1996 he was Josephus Thimister’s first assistant at Balenciaga, at the same time dealing with the foreign licences of this house.
Once settled in Paris, he decided to stay. A year as an assistant to Jean-Paul Gaultier was followed by two years of being Adéline André’s right hand man.
In 1998 he returned to Balenciaga, then under the direction of Nicolas Ghesquiere, mainly dealing with the licences for Japan. 
Then, In 1999, the time had come to launch his own collection under the name Van Ommeslaeghe. His first collection for women, for winter 1999-2000, based around the concept of dignity and inspired by the painting of the Flemish Primitives, was presented in March 1999.
It met with immediate acclaim and the designer was recognised by the Association Nationale pour le Développement des Arts de la Mode au Ministère de la Culture (ANDAM), in awarding him their fashion grant. 

Patrick Van Ommeslaeghe autumn—winter 1999—00.

After a brief stint at medical school, Patrick Van Ommeslaeghe came to the conclusion that he preferred working with living and breathing bodies rather than performing autopsies on human corpses. 

He enrolled at the Fashion Design Department of the Royal Academy of Antwerp, from which he graduated in 1990. 

Between 1992 and 1996 he was Josephus Thimister’s first assistant at Balenciaga, at the same time dealing with the foreign licences of this house.

Once settled in Paris, he decided to stay. A year as an assistant to Jean-Paul Gaultier was followed by two years of being Adéline André’s right hand man.

In 1998 he returned to Balenciaga, then under the direction of Nicolas Ghesquiere, mainly dealing with the licences for Japan. 

Then, In 1999, the time had come to launch his own collection under the name Van Ommeslaeghe. His first collection for women, for winter 1999-2000, based around the concept of dignity and inspired by the painting of the Flemish Primitives, was presented in March 1999.

It met with immediate acclaim and the designer was recognised by the Association Nationale pour le Développement des Arts de la Mode au Ministère de la Culture (ANDAM), in awarding him their fashion grant. 

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Maison Martin Margiela spring—summer 1992, Paris October 1992. Published in Street Magazine.
The Saint-Martin metro station had been out of use since 1939. For the show, 1,600 beeswax church candles illuminated the three main stairwells. The women descended and climbed the stairs to a soundtrack of audiences clapping at rock concerts. Textile motifs were painted onto the women’s skin. Colors were applied on the women’s fingertips. Each woman had a rhinestone at the inner corner of each eye.
Martin Margiela: I have known Inge for a long, long, long time now and met Ronald, through her, a long, long time ago. I like the fact that they both developed their artistic career independently and in a highly individual way, which is rare. But what I admire most is their collective work, those moments when they create something together and this magical ‘fusion’ occurs. Even though it spans many years of their work, this book does not express a feeling of new or old. For me it is evidence of their constant strive towards a joint aesthetic. We started around the same time and were both driven to create that (so aspired to) ‘something different’. It is no wonder that from the very beginning, we continued, separately or together, to surprise each other. I am proud that we can share today these precious images that will speak of us forever. 

Maison Martin Margiela spring—summer 1992, Paris October 1992. Published in Street Magazine.

The Saint-Martin metro station had been out of use since 1939. For the show, 1,600 beeswax church candles illuminated the three main stairwells. The women descended and climbed the stairs to a soundtrack of audiences clapping at rock concerts. Textile motifs were painted onto the women’s skin. Colors were applied on the women’s fingertips. Each woman had a rhinestone at the inner corner of each eye.

Martin Margiela: I have known Inge for a long, long, long time now and met Ronald, through her, a long, long time ago. I like the fact that they both developed their artistic career independently and in a highly individual way, which is rare. But what I admire most is their collective work, those moments when they create something together and this magical ‘fusion’ occurs. Even though it spans many years of their work, this book does not express a feeling of new or old. For me it is evidence of their constant strive towards a joint aesthetic. We started around the same time and were both driven to create that (so aspired to) ‘something different’. It is no wonder that from the very beginning, we continued, separately or together, to surprise each other. I am proud that we can share today these precious images that will speak of us forever. 

(Source: dekonstruktivisme)

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Sophie d’Hoore autumn—winter 1999-00.
Passionately interested in the structure of clothing, d’Hoore became engrossed in the craft of dressmaking, rediscovering and reworking classical shapes in a style that was entirely her own. Her patterns are clear and put together logically, always aiming for flexibility. She plays with contrasts between male and female forms, such as jogging trousers in taffeta and an evening dress in heavy poplin. She chooses the most beautiful materials, in maginificent wools, cottons, cashmeres and silks. 
For the realisation of her designs she demands first-class tailoring, beautifully finished. The use of haute couture techniques such as ‘double face’ make her coats look as beautiful on the inside as they do on the outside. 
Each season she extends her basic colours to provide a distinctive palette. For Winter 1999 white is accompanied by black, grey, beige and navy blue with red, fuchsia and orange. 
Her collections are put together ingeniously. Each collection is a coherent whole of vests, trousers, skirts, suits, and coats. Even when combined with one another, the ensembles always look as if they were designed as a single silhouette. 
D’Hoore has a contemporary feel for combining luxury with comfort, city clothes with sportswear. She succeeds in showing that luxury can be very simple and simplicity very luxurious. 

Sophie d’Hoore autumn—winter 1999-00.

Passionately interested in the structure of clothing, d’Hoore became engrossed in the craft of dressmaking, rediscovering and reworking classical shapes in a style that was entirely her own. Her patterns are clear and put together logically, always aiming for flexibility. She plays with contrasts between male and female forms, such as jogging trousers in taffeta and an evening dress in heavy poplin. She chooses the most beautiful materials, in maginificent wools, cottons, cashmeres and silks. 

For the realisation of her designs she demands first-class tailoring, beautifully finished. The use of haute couture techniques such as ‘double face’ make her coats look as beautiful on the inside as they do on the outside. 

Each season she extends her basic colours to provide a distinctive palette. For Winter 1999 white is accompanied by black, grey, beige and navy blue with red, fuchsia and orange. 

Her collections are put together ingeniously. Each collection is a coherent whole of vests, trousers, skirts, suits, and coats. Even when combined with one another, the ensembles always look as if they were designed as a single silhouette. 

D’Hoore has a contemporary feel for combining luxury with comfort, city clothes with sportswear. She succeeds in showing that luxury can be very simple and simplicity very luxurious. 

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Raf Simons spring—summer 1999.
Raf Simons organised his show at the “Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie” in Paris on the 3rd of July 1998.The “Kinetic Youth” collection was presented outside, in front of the enormous mirror ball located in La Villette’s Science and Industry museum in Paris. The set refers to the architectural influences in Raf Simons’ life and also to kinetic objects from his youth.Raf Simons used different songs of David Bowie during the whole show. The opening part:The show opened with David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” and the opening part was inspired by the graphic style of “Bauhaus”;-Clean lines-Shirts with white/black contrast (different black pleats in the back and black triangle on the front)-Black wool pants with on the front one, two or three pleats The second part:A group of very young teenagers wearing white turtleneck shirts with an “R” symbol, stitched on the collar. Their pants were all in different colours; red, petrol, light grey, mint, beige mêlée, marine…The models walked together in a group on the bridge, on one side of the runway leading to the mirror ball, then to the central building and to the bridge on the opposite side of the first one.-Inspiration: School Memories, for example gymnastic lessons in uniform, repetition.-Music: “Life on Mars”, David Bowie.The global idea behind the last two show parts was the inspiration of the “Rubik’s cube” object; order and disorder of colours.The third part:Classic ton-sur-ton outfits with merino wool knitted pullovers and classic suits. This time the pleated pants are light grey, beige mêlée, brown and marine.The fourth part:The most important material in this part was the coloured leather. Raf Simons showed mixed coloured outfits, like trashed cutted rock t-shirts in yellow and green, with large leather jogging pants and sleeveless tunic jackets. Colours brown, grey, light grey, aubergine, mint, green, red……-Music: “Heroes”, David Bowie.The song of the final part: ”Another brick in the Wall” from Pink Floyd. The whole group of ca. 60 boys walked quite fast on the runway, but now in the opposite direction. The order becomes a disorder, as in the song: ”we don’t need no education”. Raf Simons feels inspired by youth culture: on one side they are wearing uniforms, but inside they still feel like HEROES, like unique individuals.

Raf Simons spring—summer 1999.

Raf Simons organised his show at the “Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie” in Paris on the 3rd of July 1998.
The “Kinetic Youth” collection was presented outside, in front of the enormous mirror ball located in La Villette’s Science and Industry museum in Paris. The set refers to the architectural influences in Raf Simons’ life and also to kinetic objects from his youth.

Raf Simons used different songs of David Bowie during the whole show. 

The opening part:
The show opened with David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” and the opening part was inspired by the graphic style of “Bauhaus”;
-Clean lines
-Shirts with white/black contrast (different black pleats in the back and black triangle on the front)
-Black wool pants with on the front one, two or three pleats 

The second part:
A group of very young teenagers wearing white turtleneck shirts with an “R” symbol, stitched on the collar. Their pants were all in different colours; red, petrol, light grey, mint, beige mêlée, marine…The models walked together in a group on the bridge, on one side of the runway leading to the mirror ball, then to the central building and to the bridge on the opposite side of the first one.
-Inspiration: School Memories, for example gymnastic lessons in uniform, repetition.
-Music: “Life on Mars”, David Bowie.

The global idea behind the last two show parts was the inspiration of the “Rubik’s cube” object; order and disorder of colours.

The third part:
Classic ton-sur-ton outfits with merino wool knitted pullovers and classic suits. This time the pleated pants are light grey, beige mêlée, brown and marine.

The fourth part:
The most important material in this part was the coloured leather. Raf Simons showed mixed coloured outfits, like trashed cutted rock t-shirts in yellow and green, with large leather jogging pants and sleeveless tunic jackets. Colours brown, grey, light grey, aubergine, mint, green, red……
-Music: “Heroes”, David Bowie.

The song of the final part: ”Another brick in the Wall” from Pink Floyd. 
The whole group of ca. 60 boys walked quite fast on the runway, but now in the opposite direction. The order becomes a disorder, as in the song: ”we don’t need no education”. Raf Simons feels inspired by youth culture: on one side they are wearing uniforms, but inside they still feel like HEROES, like unique individuals.

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Walter Van Beirendonck W.&L.T. spring—summer 1997.
Show:Simultaneously at the Elysée Montmartre and the Trianon Theatre, Paris.Setting: Aliens landed at the Elysée Montmartre and stepped out of a huge video screen. They walked straight out of the room and into the street to the Trianon Theatre, where British band Agent Provocateur was performing live. Then, all models/aliens returned to the Elysée Montmartre revealed the second venue with the cheering audience and the big finale.Styling: the M.i.B.: 40 ‘Kachina’ warriors with black helmets and masks, E.T.: 40 sweet and ecologically aware aliens and U.F.O.: 40 Eastern Toyboys and Glam Geishas wearing oversized, brightly coloured and decorated ‘traditional’ wigs.Invitation: A Puk-Puk watch with a fresh cabdy fragrance.

Walter Van Beirendonck W.&L.T. spring—summer 1997.

Show:
Simultaneously at the Elysée Montmartre and the Trianon Theatre, Paris.

Setting: 
Aliens landed at the Elysée Montmartre and stepped out of a huge video screen. They walked straight out of the room and into the street to the Trianon Theatre, where British band Agent Provocateur was performing live. Then, all models/aliens returned to the Elysée Montmartre revealed the second venue with the cheering audience and the big finale.

Styling: the M.i.B.: 40 ‘Kachina’ warriors with black helmets and masks, E.T.: 40 sweet and ecologically aware aliens and U.F.O.: 40 Eastern Toyboys and Glam Geishas wearing oversized, brightly coloured and decorated ‘traditional’ wigs.

Invitation: A Puk-Puk watch with a fresh cabdy fragrance.