Theme
“I saw dresses this morning in the farmyard at Rochecorbon where I am shooting. They were hanging in the sun, side by side, like Bluebeard’s wives, only lifeless. They lacked their souls, and the soul of a dress is a body.” — Jean Cocteau, Diary Of a Film
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Ingrid Van de Wiele spring—summer 1998.
Ingrid Van de Wiele took her first steps in the fashion world more than ten years ago, but since she launched a collection under her own name onto the market six years ago, those steps have become great strides. She now has sales outlets all over the world and her own shop in Antwerp and Tokyo. 
The striking elements in Van de Wiele’s collection are the pure lines, the perfect finish, the restrained colours and the redefined materials. Her clothes tell the muted story of the quest for the perfect form, and the adept use of nips and tucks. This quest is halted momentarily for the presentation of new summer and winter collections and is then meticulously continued. Materials are given a new use: like the textile wallpaper with the appearance of imitation velvet, aluminium thread combined with nylon for a blouse, paper for a jacket. The colours are restrained (black, grey, beige, white) so that the material becomes almost intangible and nothing interferes with the purity of the form.

Ingrid Van de Wiele spring—summer 1998.

Ingrid Van de Wiele took her first steps in the fashion world more than ten years ago, but since she launched a collection under her own name onto the market six years ago, those steps have become great strides. She now has sales outlets all over the world and her own shop in Antwerp and Tokyo. 

The striking elements in Van de Wiele’s collection are the pure lines, the perfect finish, the restrained colours and the redefined materials. Her clothes tell the muted story of the quest for the perfect form, and the adept use of nips and tucks. This quest is halted momentarily for the presentation of new summer and winter collections and is then meticulously continued. Materials are given a new use: like the textile wallpaper with the appearance of imitation velvet, aluminium thread combined with nylon for a blouse, paper for a jacket. The colours are restrained (black, grey, beige, white) so that the material becomes almost intangible and nothing interferes with the purity of the form.

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W.&L.T. autumn—winter 1997—98.
Show: January 1997 at the Espace W.&L.T. at St. Denis, Paris, France.Setting: A simultaneous show on 3 parallel catwalks. Behind a transparent gaze, the models could be seen moving from catwalk to catwalk. Each entrance had light journals with different slogans flashing by. Styling: American Avatar: 40 models, strong but boyish, with transparent blindfolds like young Superheroes. African Avatar: 40 models looking like W.& L.T. Warriors, with metal headframes and ‘projected’ war make-up. Asian Avatar: 40 girls introducing the first W.& L.T. Women’s wear Collection, inspired by Ladybugs. All eyes were veiled with white transparent gauze with applied sparkling sequins. 120 hats designed by Stephen Jones crowned this collection.Invitation: ‘Kiss the Future!’-scarf with Puk-Puk badge.
Walter Van Beirendonck: A show is in the end a very important occasion. For a brief moment it gives you power over space and time. It gives you a number of opportunities which are not present in other media or in other forms of presentation. I find preparing a show very pleasant work. It is an opportunity to work out and realise my fantasies in greater detail. Fortunately I often get the chance to work on a large budget, so that I can enjoy the medium to the full. 

W.&L.T. autumn—winter 1997—98.

Show: January 1997 at the Espace W.&L.T. at St. Denis, Paris, France.

Setting: A simultaneous show on 3 parallel catwalks. Behind a transparent gaze, the models could be seen moving from catwalk to catwalk. Each entrance had light journals with different slogans flashing by. 

Styling: American Avatar: 40 models, strong but boyish, with transparent blindfolds like young Superheroes. African Avatar: 40 models looking like W.& L.T. Warriors, with metal headframes and ‘projected’ war make-up. Asian Avatar: 40 girls introducing the first W.& L.T. Women’s wear Collection, inspired by Ladybugs. All eyes were veiled with white transparent gauze with applied sparkling sequins. 120 hats designed by Stephen Jones crowned this collection.

Invitation: ‘Kiss the Future!’-scarf with Puk-Puk badge.

Walter Van Beirendonck: A show is in the end a very important occasion. For a brief moment it gives you power over space and time. It gives you a number of opportunities which are not present in other media or in other forms of presentation. I find preparing a show very pleasant work. It is an opportunity to work out and realise my fantasies in greater detail. Fortunately I often get the chance to work on a large budget, so that I can enjoy the medium to the full. 

björk - all is full of love at the riverside church, 2001.

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Veronique Branquinho autumn—winter 1998—99.
With her second collection — shown in March 1998 as her first show in Paris — her sense for mystery and a dark romanticism became even more apparent. Pleated knee-long skirts with ‘off-colour’ leggings and turtleneck sweaters were followed by pullovers in rabbit fur and heavy coats and capes with high collars. The models’ faces were pale, their teeth painted black. The atmosphere referred to the double-life of Laura Palmer in David Lynch’s Twin Peaks, to the secrecy of hidden feelings and mysterious nights-out. It seems as if Veronique Branquinho entered the subconscious of girls and women and found a different world. Bringing it to the surface, she superbly blended it with the superficial appearances of ‘real life’.  This ambiguity remains a characteristic of her subsequent collections. 
Veronique Branquinho: The most important thing for me to recognise is that a woman is a very complex person… every woman has a mystery inside her. (…) I like this black side of people. Black minds, black moods, black clothes: I like the word and I like the emotion. That’s what I try to reflect. It’s romance for the doom generation. 

Veronique Branquinho autumn—winter 199899.

With her second collection — shown in March 1998 as her first show in Paris — her sense for mystery and a dark romanticism became even more apparent. Pleated knee-long skirts with ‘off-colour’ leggings and turtleneck sweaters were followed by pullovers in rabbit fur and heavy coats and capes with high collars. The models’ faces were pale, their teeth painted black. The atmosphere referred to the double-life of Laura Palmer in David Lynch’s Twin Peaks, to the secrecy of hidden feelings and mysterious nights-out. It seems as if Veronique Branquinho entered the subconscious of girls and women and found a different world. Bringing it to the surface, she superbly blended it with the superficial appearances of ‘real life’.  This ambiguity remains a characteristic of her subsequent collections. 

Veronique Branquinho: The most important thing for me to recognise is that a woman is a very complex person… every woman has a mystery inside her. (…) I like this black side of people. Black minds, black moods, black clothes: I like the word and I like the emotion. That’s what I try to reflect. It’s romance for the doom generation. 

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Jacket with multiple sleeves, Niels Klavers autumn—winter 1999—00.

Jacket with multiple sleeves, Niels Klavers autumn—winter 1999—00.

(Source: dekonstruktivisme)

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Het Modepaleis, Dries Van Noten’s Antwerp flagship-store. (left: Van Noten or ‘Het Meuleken’, the store that belonged to his parents)
Middle: Window shopping at Geert Bruloot’s boutique Louis, Antwerp
Bottom: Trying on an Ann Demeulemeester outfit at Sonja Noël’s Stijl, Brussels

Het Modepaleis, Dries Van Noten’s Antwerp flagship-store. (left: Van Noten or ‘Het Meuleken’, the store that belonged to his parents)

Middle: Window shopping at Geert Bruloot’s boutique Louis, Antwerp

Bottom: Trying on an Ann Demeulemeester outfit at Sonja Noël’s Stijl, Brussels

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Ann Huybens autumn—winter 1997—98.
Her designs aim to combine exoticism and serenity, nostalgia and desire, chaos and peace. In concrete terms she translates this philosophy into clothes which are designed and made, literally and metaphorically, round the body.  All pieces in her collections can only be ordered to measure. She creates mainly for women, regardless of age, shape or size. 
Her collections always contain sections for afternoons, evenings and nights. Huybens intends this division into three sections to represent the circular course taken by a woman’s life. Her clothing is three-dimensional, wound in a spiral round the body, with no beginning and no end, an unceasing movement. She uses stitching, piping and contrasting colours to emphasise the seams that run round the body. Asymmetric fastenings, details and shapes ensure freedom of movement. A spiral skirt and a tango dress are typical items in her collections. The spiral skirt is a skirt with neither beginning nor end, wound in a spiral round the hips. Her tango dress has a long train that can be tied up by means of a small loop. Let’s dance! 
On the occasion of her Winter collection 1997-98, Huybens for the first time brought out a jewellery collection based on her ‘eye’ symbol. Later she also made pieces of jewellery from organic waste such as fish bones. Animal and vegetable leftovers, leaves, feathers and fish bones are also used in her clothes. A few of her pieces for Summer 1999 were made of bits of material, stuck together, modelled to the body. This process was in due course extented to include pieces of dried meat.

Ann Huybens autumn—winter 1997—98.

Her designs aim to combine exoticism and serenity, nostalgia and desire, chaos and peace. In concrete terms she translates this philosophy into clothes which are designed and made, literally and metaphorically, round the body.  All pieces in her collections can only be ordered to measure. She creates mainly for women, regardless of age, shape or size. 

Her collections always contain sections for afternoons, evenings and nights. Huybens intends this division into three sections to represent the circular course taken by a woman’s life. Her clothing is three-dimensional, wound in a spiral round the body, with no beginning and no end, an unceasing movement. She uses stitching, piping and contrasting colours to emphasise the seams that run round the body. Asymmetric fastenings, details and shapes ensure freedom of movement. A spiral skirt and a tango dress are typical items in her collections. The spiral skirt is a skirt with neither beginning nor end, wound in a spiral round the hips. Her tango dress has a long train that can be tied up by means of a small loop. Let’s dance! 

On the occasion of her Winter collection 1997-98, Huybens for the first time brought out a jewellery collection based on her ‘eye’ symbol. Later she also made pieces of jewellery from organic waste such as fish bones. Animal and vegetable leftovers, leaves, feathers and fish bones are also used in her clothes. A few of her pieces for Summer 1999 were made of bits of material, stuck together, modelled to the body. This process was in due course extented to include pieces of dried meat.

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Raf Simons autumn—winter 1998—99.
Raf Simons organised his elaborately orchestrated show, called ‘RADIOACTIVITY’ in the Moulin Rouge in Paris on Friday January 23rd 1998. 
The collection was inspired by: Kraftwerk, Laurie Anderson, Vanessa Beecroft, Ceremony the 80’s New Wave and Punk. The show was a continuous alternation of classic and trash.Make-up and Hair: The head group of the models had dyed black hair and pale faces. The faces of the Kraftwerk part were made up in white, with bright red lips. Four spider-men appeared with a spider-web on their faces.
The silhouettes: Tight, strictly classical, shapes with influences of Punk, New Wave and historical costumes. The coats had a sharp form and shiny zippers. A group of female models appeared wearing slim classic jackets, bodysuits, tights and high heeled shoes and with shiny motorcycle helmets on their heads, all in black.Colours : Black, Grey and red (Kraftwerk shirts).

Raf Simons autumn—winter 1998—99.

Raf Simons organised his elaborately orchestrated show, called ‘RADIOACTIVITY’ in the Moulin Rouge in Paris on Friday January 23rd 1998. 

The collection was inspired by: Kraftwerk, Laurie Anderson, Vanessa Beecroft, Ceremony the 80’s New Wave and Punk. The show was a continuous alternation of classic and trash.

Make-up and Hair: The head group of the models had dyed black hair and pale faces. The faces of the Kraftwerk part were made up in white, with bright red lips. Four spider-men appeared with a spider-web on their faces.

The silhouettes: Tight, strictly classical, shapes with influences of Punk, New Wave and historical costumes. The coats had a sharp form and shiny zippers. A group of female models appeared wearing slim classic jackets, bodysuits, tights and high heeled shoes and with shiny motorcycle helmets on their heads, all in black.

Colours : Black, Grey and red (Kraftwerk shirts).

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Jurgi Persoons autumn—winter 2002—03.
The presentation was held at the entrance of the Galeria Museum. The museum entrance is at the top of some stairs. The courtyard is to symbolically represent a school playground. Students are playing basketball and jumping rope. When the bell rang, the students form a queue on the stairs. All are wearing Persoons designs. They stay posed as if waiting to be photographed. Movement stops for 10 minutes. Models are in leather jackets with graffiti and tartan checked pants, v-neck sweaters and pleated skirts, and embroidered coats and jeans. The teacher was wearing a Chanel-type suit. Again the bell sounds and the models leave one by one.

Jurgi Persoons autumn—winter 2002—03.

The presentation was held at the entrance of the Galeria Museum. The museum entrance is at the top of some stairs. The courtyard is to symbolically represent a school playground. Students are playing basketball and jumping rope. When the bell rang, the students form a queue on the stairs. All are wearing Persoons designs. They stay posed as if waiting to be photographed. Movement stops for 10 minutes. 

Models are in leather jackets with graffiti and tartan checked pants, v-neck sweaters and pleated skirts, and embroidered coats and jeans. The teacher was wearing a Chanel-type suit. 

Again the bell sounds and the models leave one by one.

(Source: dekonstruktivisme)

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Bless N°14
Shopping Supports, Carriage
Made to enhance the stability of satisfaction in every shopping process, some of them assure a comfortable transport of new belongings on the way home, while others stay very close and protect meanwhile effortlessly the body.

Bless N°14

Shopping Supports, Carriage

Made to enhance the stability of satisfaction in every shopping process, some of them assure a comfortable transport of new belongings on the way home, while others stay very close and protect meanwhile effortlessly the body.

(Source: zoku)

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Walter Van Beirendonck spring—summer 1999.
Presentation: 8 presentations-October 1998-old movie heater -‘Technicolore’-Paris.This W.&L.T. Collection was presented in a short movie. Two ‘Dimension-travellers’ arrive on planet earth, start to discover, study and enjoy nature… and humans. The images were shot on a rainy night at the Zoniënwoud, a forest in Brussels, and various locations in Belgium. Nature and technology, perfectly in balance and harmony were the main-inspirations for this last W.&L.T.- collection designed by Walter Van Beirendonck.Invitation: personalized entrance ticket for movie theater.

Walter Van Beirendonck spring—summer 1999.

Presentation: 8 presentations-October 1998-old movie heater -‘Technicolore’-Paris.

This W.&L.T. Collection was presented in a short movie. Two ‘Dimension-travellers’ arrive on planet earth, start to discover, study and enjoy nature… and humans. The images were shot on a rainy night at the Zoniënwoud, a forest in Brussels, and various locations in Belgium. Nature and technology, perfectly in balance and harmony were the main-inspirations for this last W.&L.T.- collection designed by Walter Van Beirendonck.

Invitation: personalized entrance ticket for movie theater.

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Detail of the installation for the retrospective ‘La Maison Martin Margiela (9/4/1612)’ at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 11 June — 17 August, 1997. 
Martin Margiela has already taken part in various exhibitions on contemporary fashion. His first solo exhibition was held in the Summer of 1997 in the Rotterdam Boijmans Van Beuningen Museum. It was a retrospective of his work, La Maison Martin MArgiela (9/4/1615). Eighteen dummies with Margiela creations, one silhouette from each collection, were arranged outside the Henket pavilion. The visitor stood on the inside and looked out: the opposite of window-shopping. 
The clothes had been treated with selected bacteria and moulds for four days. They had been stored in appropriate surroundings to enable the organisms to feed and multiply. Splendid discolorations were the result. The moulds, the discolorations and the wind brought the silhouettes to life. It was an extremely dramatic picture: the poetry of decay. 

Detail of the installation for the retrospective ‘La Maison Martin Margiela (9/4/1612)’ at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 11 June — 17 August, 1997. 

Martin Margiela has already taken part in various exhibitions on contemporary fashion. His first solo exhibition was held in the Summer of 1997 in the Rotterdam Boijmans Van Beuningen Museum. It was a retrospective of his work, La Maison Martin MArgiela (9/4/1615). Eighteen dummies with Margiela creations, one silhouette from each collection, were arranged outside the Henket pavilion. The visitor stood on the inside and looked out: the opposite of window-shopping. 

The clothes had been treated with selected bacteria and moulds for four days. They had been stored in appropriate surroundings to enable the organisms to feed and multiply. Splendid discolorations were the result. The moulds, the discolorations and the wind brought the silhouettes to life. It was an extremely dramatic picture: the poetry of decay. 

goodbadinbetween said: Absolutely adore the blog. Great insight on the designers ideas and visions. Fun reads!

I’m glad you enjoy it! :)

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Maison Martin Margiela autumn—winter 1995—96, Paris March 1995. Fashion show in a circus tent in the Bois de Boulogne in Paris. Model’s  faces were covered with a black muslin veil.


Martin Margiela: I have known Inge for a long, long, long time now and met Ronald, through her, a long, long time ago. I like the fact that they both developed their artistic career independently and in a highly individual way, which is rare. But what I admire most is their collective work, those moments when they create something together and this magical ‘fusion’ occurs. Even though it spans many years of their work, this book does not express a feeling of new or old. For me it is evidence of their constant strive towards a joint aesthetic. We started around the same time and were both driven to create that (so aspired to) ‘something different’. It is no wonder that from the very beginning, we continued, separately or together, to surprise each other. I am proud that we can share today these precious images that will speak of us forever. 

Maison Martin Margiela autumn—winter 1995—96, Paris March 1995. Fashion show in a circus tent in the Bois de Boulogne in Paris. Model’s  faces were covered with a black muslin veil.

Martin Margiela: I have known Inge for a long, long, long time now and met Ronald, through her, a long, long time ago. I like the fact that they both developed their artistic career independently and in a highly individual way, which is rare. But what I admire most is their collective work, those moments when they create something together and this magical ‘fusion’ occurs. Even though it spans many years of their work, this book does not express a feeling of new or old. For me it is evidence of their constant strive towards a joint aesthetic. We started around the same time and were both driven to create that (so aspired to) ‘something different’. It is no wonder that from the very beginning, we continued, separately or together, to surprise each other. I am proud that we can share today these precious images that will speak of us forever. 

(Source: dekonstruktivisme)