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Ann Huybens spring—summer 1998.
Her designs aim to combine exoticism and serenity, nostalgia and desire, chaos and peace. In concrete terms she translates this philosophy into clothes which are designed and made, literally and metaphorically, round the body.  All pieces in her collections can only be ordered to measure. She creates mainly for women, regardless of age, shape or size. 
Her collections always contain sections for afternoons, evenings and nights. Huybens intends this division into three sections to represent the circular course taken by a woman’s life. Her clothing is three-dimensional, wound in a spiral round the body, with no beginning and no end, an unceasing movement. She uses stitching, piping and contrasting colours to emphasise the seams that run round the body. Asymmetric fastenings, details and shapes ensure freedom of movement. A spiral skirt and a tango dress are typical items in her collections. The spiral skirt is a skirt with neither beginning nor end, wound in a spiral round the hips. Her tango dress has a long train that can be tied up by means of a small loop. Let’s dance! 
In her choice of fabrics she is always on the lookout for material that is kind to the skin, and so natural rather than synthetic. Organic prints, embroidery and shot fabrics supply changes in colour as the wearer moves or the light changes. The seven shades of colour appearing on the Tranche de Vie print on silk crêpe, provide an example of her favourite colours, ranging from strong colours to gentle shades. Her love for the organic is so great that she uses natural materials in her designs. Shoes for example are given a ‘drumstick’ heel or made entirely from pony or ostrich leather. (Mink shawls and feather boas, wraparound suede belt 5 metres long)
Ann Huybens: I find a man dressed in a very refined dress the height of eroticism. I go on the assumption that men have the right to wear dresses, to be able to feel very fine materials on their body. It seems to me they have even less freedom than women in how they can move and behave. 

Ann Huybens spring—summer 1998.

Her designs aim to combine exoticism and serenity, nostalgia and desire, chaos and peace. In concrete terms she translates this philosophy into clothes which are designed and made, literally and metaphorically, round the body.  All pieces in her collections can only be ordered to measure. She creates mainly for women, regardless of age, shape or size. 

Her collections always contain sections for afternoons, evenings and nights. Huybens intends this division into three sections to represent the circular course taken by a woman’s life. Her clothing is three-dimensional, wound in a spiral round the body, with no beginning and no end, an unceasing movement. She uses stitching, piping and contrasting colours to emphasise the seams that run round the body. Asymmetric fastenings, details and shapes ensure freedom of movement. A spiral skirt and a tango dress are typical items in her collections. The spiral skirt is a skirt with neither beginning nor end, wound in a spiral round the hips. Her tango dress has a long train that can be tied up by means of a small loop. Let’s dance! 

In her choice of fabrics she is always on the lookout for material that is kind to the skin, and so natural rather than synthetic. Organic prints, embroidery and shot fabrics supply changes in colour as the wearer moves or the light changes. The seven shades of colour appearing on the Tranche de Vie print on silk crêpe, provide an example of her favourite colours, ranging from strong colours to gentle shades. Her love for the organic is so great that she uses natural materials in her designs. Shoes for example are given a ‘drumstick’ heel or made entirely from pony or ostrich leather. (Mink shawls and feather boas, wraparound suede belt 5 metres long)

Ann Huybens: I find a man dressed in a very refined dress the height of eroticism. I go on the assumption that men have the right to wear dresses, to be able to feel very fine materials on their body. It seems to me they have even less freedom than women in how they can move and behave. 

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Anna Heylen, First Dolls collection, Antwerp ‘93, Cultural Capital of Europe.
Anna Heylen is known chiefly for her dolls. They were ‘born’ for Antwerp ‘93, Cultural Capital of Europe. She was asked to express her views on fashion, which she did in an installation comprising strange, identical, faceless and sexless dolls, suspended from flimsy threads. The dolls came alive once they were clothed, and then they radiated their own identity. The message was: “Don’t take fashion too seriously, don’t take life too seriously”. Their success was so great that they have produced for sale in limited editions on several occasions. 
Anna Heylen has a strong, sensitive urge to reconcile constrasts and controversies in harmony. This is clear from the themes of the collections, the inspiration, the use of different materials in one model, the use of reversed weaves, different kinds of yarns in knitwear, reversed sleeves, the composition of materials, mixed culture, tolerance. Contradictions are reorientated, blended until they become mutually reinforcing. China is her favourite country. Accordingly, her 1998 summer collection was inspired by the Chinese nomads, who undergo a wide variety of influences during their travels. Their threadbare clothes are repaired with materials from the areas in which they happen to find themselves, resulting in all kinds of strange combinations. Her labels form her highly personal ‘business card’. They have a different image for every collection.
Anna Heylen: These dolls are my soul and my great frustration. It mirrors life; Clip!, it’s over.  

Anna Heylen, First Dolls collection, Antwerp ‘93, Cultural Capital of Europe.

Anna Heylen is known chiefly for her dolls. They were ‘born’ for Antwerp ‘93, Cultural Capital of Europe. She was asked to express her views on fashion, which she did in an installation comprising strange, identical, faceless and sexless dolls, suspended from flimsy threads. The dolls came alive once they were clothed, and then they radiated their own identity. The message was: “Don’t take fashion too seriously, don’t take life too seriously”. Their success was so great that they have produced for sale in limited editions on several occasions. 

Anna Heylen has a strong, sensitive urge to reconcile constrasts and controversies in harmony. This is clear from the themes of the collections, the inspiration, the use of different materials in one model, the use of reversed weaves, different kinds of yarns in knitwear, reversed sleeves, the composition of materials, mixed culture, tolerance. Contradictions are reorientated, blended until they become mutually reinforcing. China is her favourite country. Accordingly, her 1998 summer collection was inspired by the Chinese nomads, who undergo a wide variety of influences during their travels. Their threadbare clothes are repaired with materials from the areas in which they happen to find themselves, resulting in all kinds of strange combinations. Her labels form her highly personal ‘business card’. They have a different image for every collection.

Anna Heylen: These dolls are my soul and my great frustration. It mirrors life; Clip!, it’s over.  

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Anna Heylen spring—summer 1998.
Anna Heylen is known chiefly for her dolls. They were ‘born’ for Antwerp ‘93, Cultural Capital of Europe. She was asked to express her views on fashion, which she did in an installation comprising strange, identical, faceless and sexless dolls, suspended from flimsy threads. The dolls came alive once they were clothed, and then they radiated their own identity. The message was: “Don’t take fashion too seriously, don’t take life too seriously”. Their success was so great that they have produced for sale in limited editions on several occasions. 
Anna Heylen has a strong, sensitive urge to reconcile constrasts and controversies in harmony. This is clear from the themes of the collections, the inspiration, the use of different materials in one model, the use of reversed weaves, different kinds of yarns in knitwear, reversed sleeves, the composition of materials, mixed culture, tolerance. Contradictions are reorientated, blended until they become mutually reinforcing. China is her favourite country. Accordingly, her 1998 summer collection was inspired by the Chinese nomads, who undergo a wide variety of influences during their travels. Their threadbare clothes are repaired with materials from the areas in which they happen to find themselves, resulting in all kinds of strange combinations. Her labels form her highly personal ‘business card’. They have a different image for every collection.
Anna Heylen: These dolls are my soul and my great frustration. It mirrors life; Clip!, it’s over.  

Anna Heylen spring—summer 1998.

Anna Heylen is known chiefly for her dolls. They were ‘born’ for Antwerp ‘93, Cultural Capital of Europe. She was asked to express her views on fashion, which she did in an installation comprising strange, identical, faceless and sexless dolls, suspended from flimsy threads. The dolls came alive once they were clothed, and then they radiated their own identity. The message was: “Don’t take fashion too seriously, don’t take life too seriously”. Their success was so great that they have produced for sale in limited editions on several occasions. 

Anna Heylen has a strong, sensitive urge to reconcile constrasts and controversies in harmony. This is clear from the themes of the collections, the inspiration, the use of different materials in one model, the use of reversed weaves, different kinds of yarns in knitwear, reversed sleeves, the composition of materials, mixed culture, tolerance. Contradictions are reorientated, blended until they become mutually reinforcing. China is her favourite country. Accordingly, her 1998 summer collection was inspired by the Chinese nomads, who undergo a wide variety of influences during their travels. Their threadbare clothes are repaired with materials from the areas in which they happen to find themselves, resulting in all kinds of strange combinations. Her labels form her highly personal ‘business card’. They have a different image for every collection.

Anna Heylen: These dolls are my soul and my great frustration. It mirrors life; Clip!, it’s over.  

(Source: dekonstruktivisme, via dekonstruktivisme)

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Anna Heylen autumn—winter 1998—99.
Theme of the collection: A Chinese immigrant arriving in the USA. 
Anna Heylen is known chiefly for her dolls. They were ‘born’ for Antwerp ‘93, Cultural Capital of Europe. She was asked to express her views on fashion, which she did in an installation comprising strange, identical, faceless and sexless dolls, suspended from flimsy threads. The dolls came alive once they were clothed, and then they radiated their own identity. The message was: “Don’t take fashion too seriously, don’t take life too seriously”. Their success was so great that they have produced for sale in limited editions on several occasions. 
Anna Heylen has a strong, sensitive urge to reconcile constrasts and controversies in harmony. This is clear from the themes of the collections, the inspiration, the use of different materials in one model, the use of reversed weaves, different kinds of yarns in knitwear, reversed sleeves, the composition of materials, mixed culture, tolerance. Contradictions are reorientated, blended until they become mutually reinforcing. China is her favourite country. Accordingly, her 1998 summer collection was inspired by the Chinese nomads, who undergo a wide variety of influences during their travels. Their threadbare clothes are repaired with materials from the areas in which they happen to find themselves, resulting in all kinds of strange combinations. Her labels form her highly personal ‘business card’. They have a different image for every collection.

Anna Heylen autumn—winter 1998—99.

Theme of the collection: A Chinese immigrant arriving in the USA. 

Anna Heylen is known chiefly for her dolls. They were ‘born’ for Antwerp ‘93, Cultural Capital of Europe. She was asked to express her views on fashion, which she did in an installation comprising strange, identical, faceless and sexless dolls, suspended from flimsy threads. The dolls came alive once they were clothed, and then they radiated their own identity. The message was: “Don’t take fashion too seriously, don’t take life too seriously”. Their success was so great that they have produced for sale in limited editions on several occasions. 

Anna Heylen has a strong, sensitive urge to reconcile constrasts and controversies in harmony. This is clear from the themes of the collections, the inspiration, the use of different materials in one model, the use of reversed weaves, different kinds of yarns in knitwear, reversed sleeves, the composition of materials, mixed culture, tolerance. Contradictions are reorientated, blended until they become mutually reinforcing. China is her favourite country. Accordingly, her 1998 summer collection was inspired by the Chinese nomads, who undergo a wide variety of influences during their travels. Their threadbare clothes are repaired with materials from the areas in which they happen to find themselves, resulting in all kinds of strange combinations. Her labels form her highly personal ‘business card’. They have a different image for every collection.

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Maison Martin Margiela spring—summer 1989, Paris October 1988. Published in Street Magazine.
The creation of Martin Margiela is romantic. It is not the taste of the clothes itself, but the relationship between his belief and the effect from its result. It crosses the boundaries of mode or art, and suggests the possibilities of the creations to all the people concerned, reminding them of courage and pride. For that reason, although Margiela’s creation is always full of unexpectedness, it is mainstream and core. 
Martin Margiela: I have known Inge for a long, long, long time now and met Ronald, through her, a long, long time ago. I like the fact that they both developed their artistic career independently and in a highly individual way, which is rare. But what I admire most is their collective work, those moments when they create something together and this magical ‘fusion’ occurs. Even though it spans many years of their work, this book does not express a feeling of new or old. For me it is evidence of their constant strive towards a joint aesthetic. We started around the same time and were both driven to create that (so aspired to) ‘something different’. It is no wonder that from the very beginning, we continued, separately or together, to surprise each other. I am proud that we can share today these precious images that will speak of us forever. 

Maison Martin Margiela spring—summer 1989, Paris October 1988. Published in Street Magazine.

The creation of Martin Margiela is romantic. It is not the taste of the clothes itself, but the relationship between his belief and the effect from its result. It crosses the boundaries of mode or art, and suggests the possibilities of the creations to all the people concerned, reminding them of courage and pride. For that reason, although Margiela’s creation is always full of unexpectedness, it is mainstream and core. 

Martin Margiela: I have known Inge for a long, long, long time now and met Ronald, through her, a long, long time ago. I like the fact that they both developed their artistic career independently and in a highly individual way, which is rare. But what I admire most is their collective work, those moments when they create something together and this magical ‘fusion’ occurs. Even though it spans many years of their work, this book does not express a feeling of new or old. For me it is evidence of their constant strive towards a joint aesthetic. We started around the same time and were both driven to create that (so aspired to) ‘something different’. It is no wonder that from the very beginning, we continued, separately or together, to surprise each other. I am proud that we can share today these precious images that will speak of us forever. 

(Source: dekonstruktivisme)

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Make-up by Peter Philips for Veronique Branquinho, show spring—summer 1999.

Make-up by Peter Philips for Veronique Branquinho, show springsummer 1999.

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Ann Demeulemeester spring—summer 1995 to spring—summer 1999.

Ann Demeulemeester spring—summer 1995 to spring—summer 1999.

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Raf Simons autumn—winter 1998—99.
Raf Simons organised his elaborately orchestrated show, called ‘RADIOACTIVITY’ in the Moulin Rouge in Paris on Friday January 23rd 1998. 
The collection was inspired by: Kraftwerk, Laurie Anderson, Vanessa Beecroft, Ceremony the 80’s New Wave and Punk. The show was a continuous alternation of classic and trash.Make-up and Hair: The head group of the models had dyed black hair and pale faces. The faces of the Kraftwerk part were made up in white, with bright red lips. Four spider-men appeared with a spider-web on their faces.
The silhouettes: Tight, strictly classical, shapes with influences of Punk, New Wave and historical costumes. The coats had a sharp form and shiny zippers. A group of female models appeared wearing slim classic jackets, bodysuits, tights and high heeled shoes and with shiny motorcycle helmets on their heads, all in black.Colours : Black, Grey and red (Kraftwerk shirts).

Raf Simons autumn—winter 1998—99.

Raf Simons organised his elaborately orchestrated show, called ‘RADIOACTIVITY’ in the Moulin Rouge in Paris on Friday January 23rd 1998. 

The collection was inspired by: Kraftwerk, Laurie Anderson, Vanessa Beecroft, Ceremony the 80’s New Wave and Punk. The show was a continuous alternation of classic and trash.

Make-up and Hair: The head group of the models had dyed black hair and pale faces. The faces of the Kraftwerk part were made up in white, with bright red lips. Four spider-men appeared with a spider-web on their faces.

The silhouettes: Tight, strictly classical, shapes with influences of Punk, New Wave and historical costumes. The coats had a sharp form and shiny zippers. A group of female models appeared wearing slim classic jackets, bodysuits, tights and high heeled shoes and with shiny motorcycle helmets on their heads, all in black.

Colours : Black, Grey and red (Kraftwerk shirts).

(Source: tracksoot2, via 66lanvin)

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Jurgi Persoons autumn—winter 1999—00, spring—summer 1999.
His designs are quite extreme and can be disturbing and arouse controversy, yet this is what makes them fascinating. Slanting hems, tweed combined with snake skin, tartan checks with finely worked embroideries create a style which is on the verge of bad taste. But despite taking these risks, his clothes are not ugly. The way in which his clothes are presented, especially in photographs, reflects the mood of his collection, leaving a forceful and unforgettable impression. 
With each new collection, Jurgi Persoons refers to human characteristics, sentiments, situations, convictions, radical attitudes and their emotional impact. His universe raises questions, rather than giving judgments. 
Jurgi Persoons combines a naive sense of humour with aggressive contrasts. As he states it: “People’s aspirations for a certain ideal appearance often transpire through the mistakes they make in the search for that ideal, and that is exactly what interests me most, because their failing efforts often produce quite hyperrealistic images. It’s the tension between these imperfect attempt to create a certain image and that which is considered socially acceptable — that evokes strong reactions, like aversion or adoration.”

Jurgi Persoons autumn—winter 1999—00, spring—summer 1999.

His designs are quite extreme and can be disturbing and arouse controversy, yet this is what makes them fascinating. Slanting hems, tweed combined with snake skin, tartan checks with finely worked embroideries create a style which is on the verge of bad taste. But despite taking these risks, his clothes are not ugly. The way in which his clothes are presented, especially in photographs, reflects the mood of his collection, leaving a forceful and unforgettable impression. 

With each new collection, Jurgi Persoons refers to human characteristics, sentiments, situations, convictions, radical attitudes and their emotional impact. His universe raises questions, rather than giving judgments. 

Jurgi Persoons combines a naive sense of humour with aggressive contrasts. As he states it: People’s aspirations for a certain ideal appearance often transpire through the mistakes they make in the search for that ideal, and that is exactly what interests me most, because their failing efforts often produce quite hyperrealistic images. It’s the tension between these imperfect attempt to create a certain image and that which is considered socially acceptable — that evokes strong reactions, like aversion or adoration.

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Graduation work by Katharina Van Den Bossche (1990) in BAM#5, 1992.

Graduation work by Katharina Van Den Bossche (1990) in BAM#5, 1992.

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Ann Demeulemeester spring—summer 1999.
How do you suggest movement? How do you un-balance a body? How do you ‘cut’ a garment that challenges gravity? These question result, with Ann Demeulemeester, in clothes that evoke the illusion of movement, even when the wearer is standing still. Trousers slip down a little, a cardigan gapes open, a draped dress exposes a shoulder: mainly impressions of a casualness that would never betray the complicated study which was often required to achieve it. 
How can I make a collection from painter’s canvas? That was the basic question behind the Summer 1999 collection. This favourite material, which she had already used for invitations, displays and even tables, was ‘translated’ into an almost exclusively white collection. The shapes, developing further on those she started for the Winter 1998-99 collection, were conceived from what Ann Demeulemeester describes as ‘zero base’, the source of the ‘shape issue’; to set aside the repertoire of traditional patterns and to confront herself with the essence of a garment: a piece of material which you can wrap around yourself. 
This ever-recurring issue, and the difficult task she has set herself, seem to be Ann Demeulemeester’s raison d’être. A ‘de-depicted’ world, which allows entirely new ideas to develop, in which a simple intervention is all-important, in which nothing disrupts the investigation of the body, or wearability. And a world in which the whole gamut of emotions evoked by a garment — from surrender to rejection, from security to alienation — can be meticulously constructed …
The cloth is holy. 

Ann Demeulemeester spring—summer 1999.

How do you suggest movement? How do you un-balance a body? How do you ‘cut’ a garment that challenges gravity? These question result, with Ann Demeulemeester, in clothes that evoke the illusion of movement, even when the wearer is standing still. Trousers slip down a little, a cardigan gapes open, a draped dress exposes a shoulder: mainly impressions of a casualness that would never betray the complicated study which was often required to achieve it. 

How can I make a collection from painter’s canvas? That was the basic question behind the Summer 1999 collection. This favourite material, which she had already used for invitations, displays and even tables, was ‘translated’ into an almost exclusively white collection. The shapes, developing further on those she started for the Winter 1998-99 collection, were conceived from what Ann Demeulemeester describes as ‘zero base’, the source of the ‘shape issue’; to set aside the repertoire of traditional patterns and to confront herself with the essence of a garment: a piece of material which you can wrap around yourself. 

This ever-recurring issue, and the difficult task she has set herself, seem to be Ann Demeulemeester’s raison d’être. A ‘de-depicted’ world, which allows entirely new ideas to develop, in which a simple intervention is all-important, in which nothing disrupts the investigation of the body, or wearability. And a world in which the whole gamut of emotions evoked by a garment — from surrender to rejection, from security to alienation — can be meticulously constructed …

The cloth is holy. 

Silhouettes by Tim Van Steenbergen (top) and Kris Van Assche (bottom), at the Pass, 1998.

By January, the students are expected to have the collection planned out, with five complete silhouettes ready to display at the ‘Pass’ (fitting) alongside their sketches and scrapbooks. The Pass can be an overwhelmingly stressful event; a midpoint in the passage of each academic year when students must present their work, inspiration and ideas to more than a dozen professors of the Academy, all arranged Last Supper-style at a long table. Criticism given at the Pass is forthright — students are picked up for failing to fully translate their ideas into garments, for poor technique, for failing to meet deadlines and even for a lack of passion and integrity. Consequently, gossip abounds among the alumni, brimming with horror stories past and present. 

Felix Böhm: By the fourth, year you’re used to it. In first year it’s terrifying because you don’t know how the professors will react. It reallly helps you get yourself together and present your things and to be as confident as possible. Especially in fourth year, you have to really organise yourself for the Pass, with the right models and so on. At the show things are organised for you, but at the Pass it’s all you.

(Source: dekonstruktivisme)

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Ingrid Van de Wiele spring—summer 1998.
Ingrid Van de Wiele took her first steps in the fashion world more than ten years ago, but since she launched a collection under her own name onto the market six years ago, those steps have become great strides. She now has sales outlets all over the world and her own shop in Antwerp and Tokyo. 
The striking elements in Van de Wiele’s collection are the pure lines, the perfect finish, the restrained colours and the redefined materials. Her clothes tell the muted story of the quest for the perfect form, and the adept use of nips and tucks. This quest is halted momentarily for the presentation of new summer and winter collections and is then meticulously continued. Materials are given a new use: like the textile wallpaper with the appearance of imitation velvet, aluminium thread combined with nylon for a blouse, paper for a jacket. The colours are restrained (black, grey, beige, white) so that the material becomes almost intangible and nothing interferes with the purity of the form.

Ingrid Van de Wiele spring—summer 1998.

Ingrid Van de Wiele took her first steps in the fashion world more than ten years ago, but since she launched a collection under her own name onto the market six years ago, those steps have become great strides. She now has sales outlets all over the world and her own shop in Antwerp and Tokyo. 

The striking elements in Van de Wiele’s collection are the pure lines, the perfect finish, the restrained colours and the redefined materials. Her clothes tell the muted story of the quest for the perfect form, and the adept use of nips and tucks. This quest is halted momentarily for the presentation of new summer and winter collections and is then meticulously continued. Materials are given a new use: like the textile wallpaper with the appearance of imitation velvet, aluminium thread combined with nylon for a blouse, paper for a jacket. The colours are restrained (black, grey, beige, white) so that the material becomes almost intangible and nothing interferes with the purity of the form.

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W.&L.T. autumn—winter 1997—98.
Show: January 1997 at the Espace W.&L.T. at St. Denis, Paris, France.Setting: A simultaneous show on 3 parallel catwalks. Behind a transparent gaze, the models could be seen moving from catwalk to catwalk. Each entrance had light journals with different slogans flashing by. Styling: American Avatar: 40 models, strong but boyish, with transparent blindfolds like young Superheroes. African Avatar: 40 models looking like W.& L.T. Warriors, with metal headframes and ‘projected’ war make-up. Asian Avatar: 40 girls introducing the first W.& L.T. Women’s wear Collection, inspired by Ladybugs. All eyes were veiled with white transparent gauze with applied sparkling sequins. 120 hats designed by Stephen Jones crowned this collection.Invitation: ‘Kiss the Future!’-scarf with Puk-Puk badge.
Walter Van Beirendonck: A show is in the end a very important occasion. For a brief moment it gives you power over space and time. It gives you a number of opportunities which are not present in other media or in other forms of presentation. I find preparing a show very pleasant work. It is an opportunity to work out and realise my fantasies in greater detail. Fortunately I often get the chance to work on a large budget, so that I can enjoy the medium to the full. 

W.&L.T. autumn—winter 1997—98.

Show: January 1997 at the Espace W.&L.T. at St. Denis, Paris, France.

Setting: A simultaneous show on 3 parallel catwalks. Behind a transparent gaze, the models could be seen moving from catwalk to catwalk. Each entrance had light journals with different slogans flashing by. 

Styling: American Avatar: 40 models, strong but boyish, with transparent blindfolds like young Superheroes. African Avatar: 40 models looking like W.& L.T. Warriors, with metal headframes and ‘projected’ war make-up. Asian Avatar: 40 girls introducing the first W.& L.T. Women’s wear Collection, inspired by Ladybugs. All eyes were veiled with white transparent gauze with applied sparkling sequins. 120 hats designed by Stephen Jones crowned this collection.

Invitation: ‘Kiss the Future!’-scarf with Puk-Puk badge.

Walter Van Beirendonck: A show is in the end a very important occasion. For a brief moment it gives you power over space and time. It gives you a number of opportunities which are not present in other media or in other forms of presentation. I find preparing a show very pleasant work. It is an opportunity to work out and realise my fantasies in greater detail. Fortunately I often get the chance to work on a large budget, so that I can enjoy the medium to the full. 

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Veronique Branquinho autumn—winter 1998—99.
With her second collection — shown in March 1998 as her first show in Paris — her sense for mystery and a dark romanticism became even more apparent. Pleated knee-long skirts with ‘off-colour’ leggings and turtleneck sweaters were followed by pullovers in rabbit fur and heavy coats and capes with high collars. The models’ faces were pale, their teeth painted black. The atmosphere referred to the double-life of Laura Palmer in David Lynch’s Twin Peaks, to the secrecy of hidden feelings and mysterious nights-out. It seems as if Veronique Branquinho entered the subconscious of girls and women and found a different world. Bringing it to the surface, she superbly blended it with the superficial appearances of ‘real life’.  This ambiguity remains a characteristic of her subsequent collections. 
Veronique Branquinho: The most important thing for me to recognise is that a woman is a very complex person… every woman has a mystery inside her. (…) I like this black side of people. Black minds, black moods, black clothes: I like the word and I like the emotion. That’s what I try to reflect. It’s romance for the doom generation. 

Veronique Branquinho autumn—winter 199899.

With her second collection — shown in March 1998 as her first show in Paris — her sense for mystery and a dark romanticism became even more apparent. Pleated knee-long skirts with ‘off-colour’ leggings and turtleneck sweaters were followed by pullovers in rabbit fur and heavy coats and capes with high collars. The models’ faces were pale, their teeth painted black. The atmosphere referred to the double-life of Laura Palmer in David Lynch’s Twin Peaks, to the secrecy of hidden feelings and mysterious nights-out. It seems as if Veronique Branquinho entered the subconscious of girls and women and found a different world. Bringing it to the surface, she superbly blended it with the superficial appearances of ‘real life’.  This ambiguity remains a characteristic of her subsequent collections. 

Veronique Branquinho: The most important thing for me to recognise is that a woman is a very complex person… every woman has a mystery inside her. (…) I like this black side of people. Black minds, black moods, black clothes: I like the word and I like the emotion. That’s what I try to reflect. It’s romance for the doom generation.